Kendrick Lamar’s Album

The album cover shows him and his child friends from Compton where he grew up around gang violence and members.

The album cover shows him and his child friends from Compton where he grew up around gang violence and members.

Luke Hansen, Reporter

One of Kendrick Lamar’s best projects is “To Pimp a Butterfly” released in 2015, and was certified platinum in 2017( which is selling a million or more copies). The album tackled the problem of social injustice, systematic racism, and social constructs for the black community.

The project was one of the first albums to be rapped fully on jazz beats and music, and this in turn broke a construct in itself of using 808s or bass drums made popular by Kanye West. This shows Kendrick’s immense talent to its fullest. 

This is one of the best hip-hop albums created because it shows the black struggle in America in 78 minutes of listening. The album is platinum certified and the first of Kendrick’s albums to go to the UK’s top 100.  

Some of the struggle mentioned are police brutality in “ The Blacker The Berry” from the murder of Trayvon Marten. “King Kunta” is based on the feeling of someone he grew up around “ Dj Quik” being murdered. “Institutionalized” talks about being  “dazed and confused/Talented but still under the neighborhood ruse.” “These Walls” talks about the lowest points in Kendrick’s life. These are just a few brief summaries of each song and its meaning. 

This album has virtually no errors or complaints from almost all 1 million listeners. The album is a solid 10/10 for me, and so are the rest of his albums. I suggest this as a late night listen or for someone wanting to get away from meaningless rap.